Battered Woman’s Syndrome Gains Judicial Support


Recent court decisions emphasize a growing trend in the acceptance of the notion that battered partners can use force to defend themselves and even kill their abusers. This domestic violence concept, referred to as “battered woman syndrome,” is based on the abusive and occasionally life threatening situations in which partners can find themselves. Such violent situations cause them to firmly believe that killing their partner is the only way to ensure their survival. This concept has been controversial however, as neither the DSM nor the ICD medical classification guides include battered woman’s syndrome as a condition severe enough to excuse alleged offenders. The latest judicial decision evidencing such a broad understanding of domestic violence was the Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole’s decision to release Gaile Owens, 58. Owens received the death penalty for being an accessory to the first-degree murder of her husband, Ron Owens, in 1984. Owens contracted […]

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David Raybin Representing Prison Inmate Believed to Have Been Killed by Prison Guards


Nashville CBS Affiliate Channel 5 recently reported on the ongoing investigation into the death of Charles Toll, a prison inmate at Nashville Tennessee’s Riverbend Maximum Security Institution. Prison officials had previously reported that the 33 year old Toll had died of natural causes, but the State Medical Examiner ruled the death a homicide. The inmate was believed to have died from “suffocation” and “asphyxia during physical restraint.” “Fighting for your rights” Contact David Weissman and the law firm of Hollins, Raybin & Weissman for a confidential consultation of your case today at 615-256-6666.

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David Raybin Interviewed on Nashville NBC News WSMV Regarding Felony Bus


The Davidson County Sheriff’s Office has a new mobile booking unit aimed at getting police officers back on the street faster after an arrest. Such unit has everything required to fingerprint, take mugs shots, and holds up to 9 detainees. The unit is designed to allow officers to quickly complete an arrest without physically leaving the street for an extended period by eliminating the need for the officers to physically escort the detainee downtown and appear before a magistrate judge. Some have questioned whether the appearance before a magistrate can be avoided without raising constitutional issues.

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